Tag Archives: small plates of Nephi

#BOMTC Jarom-Words of Mormon: Plates, Prophets, and Prosperity

Here is something pretty cool to consider that was published by Book of Mormon Central (by the way, if you have not yet found Book of Mormon Central on your favorite social media platform it is definitely time to like, follow, subscribe, etc. to them; they are amazing and will continue to produce inspiring and insightful Book of Mormon-related content for years to come). Check out the short video they produced below, “Has a Portion of the Lost 116 Pages been Discovered?” and if you are interested in learning more about this go to: What If Martin Harris Didn’t Lose All Of The 116 Pages?

Something that stands out to me in the books of Jarom to Words of Mormon is how to prosper in the Promised Land.

Plates and Lineage via Book of Mormon Central, featuring Mormon Abridging the Plates by Tom Lovell and The Gold Plates by Jerry Thompson

Ready for some alliteration? The Lord provided prophets and plates to preserve and prosper His people in the Promised Land (that is my attempt at Maxwellian alliteration…). Within these few pages we find the rise and demise of different civilizations, and generations within those civilizations, based on their diligence or indifference in heeding the words of the prophets of God. Those who preserve and obey God’s word prosper; those who do not falter. Those who obey the Lord prevail; those who rebel fail. So, do you want to prosper or falter; do you want to prevail or fail? The Lord has given us everything we need to succeed!

Sources for the Book of Mormon

The sources behind the Book of Mormon are remarkably complex, and sometimes hard to keep straight. Here is a helpful chart to use as you read and study. (Content by John Welch. Graphics by Fernando Vazquez.)

For a Wise Purpose

A seminary teacher uses over-sized models of the Book of Mormon, the gold plates, and other source plates to help his students understand the structure of the book . (11:18)

These few pages cover many different individuals, groups of people, eras, and years. Below you will find several charts that may help you study this material more effectively.

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (3)

A simple way to mark the the table of contents in the Book of Mormon to help you understand the organization of the “plates”.

 

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (4)

Visual explanation of “A Brief Explanation about the Book of Mormon” found at the beginning of the Book of Mormon

 

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (5)

Genealogical, historical, legal, and prophetic records of the Nephites were handed down in sacred trust, usually from father to son. Only four Nephite families kept the plates: Lehi’s posterity mainly through Jacob, Mosiah’s family, Alma and his long line of descendants, and Mormon and his son Moroni. As anthropologist John L. Sorenson has pointed out, the Book of Mormon is structured as a “lineage history.” Inserted from http://byustudies.byu.edu/januarybomcharts/charts/16.html | view PDF

In these charts you will find the four families of Nephite record keepers of the Book of Mormon listed chronologically, along with their approximate dates of birth and other relevant information. If a date is not found in or tied directly to a specific verse then the information has been deduced from general historical information. The list below is similar to the chart above and can be used to document and explain the relationships between keepers of the plates of Nephi (source: http://byustudies.byu.edu/januarybomcharts/charts/17.html | View PDF)

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (6) #BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (7) #BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (8)

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (9)

Although only four families kept the main Nephite records (see the charts above), the words of many other authors are included in the Book of Mormon as well. The writings or speeches of Jesus Christ, Isaiah, Captain Moroni, and Zenos, for example, all add significantly to the Book of Mormon, even though these authors did not actually write upon the plates themselves. This chart adds to charts above some of the additional writers or speakers who are quoted in the Book of Mormon. (Source: http://byustudies.byu.edu/januarybomcharts/charts/18.html | View PDF)

BONUS! My buddy, Adam Daly, sent me a chart that he created in an effort to help him understand his scripture study better. It expands on what I have listed here, and I find it very informative. It is not exhaustive, but it is very helpful! I would invite you to put your own effort into a similar endeavor so that you can receive the benefit of such diligent study and pondering. Please click on the chart to enlarge it.

Chart created by Adam Daly. He said,

CLICK ON THE CHART TO ENLARGE IT. Chart created by Adam Daly. He said, “Seeing it laid out like this helped me understand the Book or Mormon better and also remember people, places and stories better.”

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#BOMTC 2 Nephi 32-Jacob 1: From Nephi to Jacob

These pages mark a major transition in the Book of Mormon. Nephi’s final words are found in 2 Nephi 32-33, and once again we find his great anxiety for our welfare and his pattern for plainness (2 Nephi 32:8; 33:3-9). His final words are an invitation to “hearken unto these words and believe in Christ” (2 Nephi 33:10-15). A more simple, yet perfectly suited ending could not have been better for Nephi’s writings:

“for thus hath the Lord commanded me, and I must obey” (2 Nephi 33:15).

No wonder Nephi’s name seems to spring from our lips so effortlessly when illustrating examples of obedience!

#BOMTC Day 20, April 26~2 Nephi 32-Jacob 1 or Pages 115-120 FEAST Upon the Words of Christ

Jacob inherits Nephi’s Small Plates and is given instruction on what should be recorded on them (Jacob 1:1-4). Jacob is not at all new to the Book of Mormon. In fact, much of 2 Nephi is actually Nephi recording Jacob’s teaching and preaching. Many of our favorite teachings from 2 Nephi came from Jacob (2 Nephi 9 is just one example). As Nephi dies, Jacob takes ecclesiastical responsibility for the Nephite society. Unfortunately, the Nephites are struggling with quite a few spiritual problems (Jacob 1:15-16).

Reminiscent of many prophets before, and others yet to come, Jacob uses the Temple as his stage for calling the people to repentance. Nephi’s “plainness” seems to have had an effect on Jacob’s preaching (Jacob 2:11). Jacob must now help the people overcome their love of riches (v. 12), their pride (vv. 13-21), and their immorality (vv. 23-35). It’s a tough job, but Jacob has been called of God and is capable of the task at hand (Jacob 1:17-19; 2:1-7)!

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#BOMTC 1 Nephi 19-21: DESSERT FIRST!

I refer to these pages as “Dinner or Dessert” because it helps me understand how distinguish the difference and purposes of the Large and Small Plates of Nephi.

#BOMTC Day 8, April 14~1 Nephi 19-21 (or Pages 43-48) What we learn from Scriptures

Nephi had originally referred to the fact that there were two sets of records in 1 Nephi 9. He now repeats that he does not know why he has been commanded to make similar records, but emphasizes once again that it is for a “wise purpose” (1 Nephi 9:5-6; 19:3).

Sources for the Book of Mormon

The sources behind the Book of Mormon are remarkably complex, and sometimes hard to keep straight. Here is a helpful chart to use as you read and study. (Content by John Welch. Graphics by Fernando Vazquez.)

Mormon will also submit his will and scripture record to God under the same reasoning (Word of Mormon 1:7). From latter-day events and revelation we are able to understand God’s “wise purpose” in this. With the loss of the 116 manuscript pages that Martin Harris had helped Joseph Smith to translate, the Lord would provide an even greater witness of the Savior (D&C 3:19-20; 10:38-46).

Many ancient documents such as King Benjamin’s speech or the plates of brass were quoted or abridged by the ancient authors who compiled the books found on the small and large plates of Nephi. The abridgments, quotations, and original writings of those Book of Mormon historians are displayed on the left-hand and middle columns of this chart and are then shown in relation to the new set of plates produced by Mormon and Moroni that was delivered to Joseph Smith by the angel Moroni. Joseph dictated the original manuscript of the Book of Mormon from the plates of Mormon. Copying that original manuscript, parts of which survive today, Oliver Cowdery prepared a printer’s manuscript (owned by the RLDS Church). The first edition of the Book of Mormon was typeset from that printer’s manuscript. (Source: https://byustudies.byu.edu/book_of_mormon_charts/charts/13.aspx)

Many ancient documents such as King Benjamin’s speech or the plates of brass were quoted or abridged by the ancient authors who compiled the books found on the small and large plates of Nephi. The abridgments, quotations, and original writings of those Book of Mormon historians are displayed on the left-hand and middle columns of this chart and are then shown in relation to the new set of plates produced by Mormon and Moroni that was delivered to Joseph Smith by the angel Moroni. Joseph dictated the original manuscript of the Book of Mormon from the plates of Mormon.
(Source: Charting the Book of Mormon)

The records that Nephi created are referred to as the Large Plates and the Small Plates. At one point I had a hard time remembering which contained more history and which contained more ministry. I would usually have to go back to 1 Nephi 19 to figure it out. On one of these occasions when I was trying again to remember, it occurred to me to think of the different plates of Nephi as literal plates. So I actually took two disposable paper plates, one large and one small, and wrote down on each one what was contained–Large had history, Small had ministry.

Through the Martin Harris incident we lost part of Nephi’s Large Plate account. In the Doctrine and Covenants we find the Lord’s wisdom in commanding Nephi to create the Small Plates over 2,000 years before. The history would be lost, but the ministry would be preserved. (For some very insightful and informative information on the topic of the translation and the lost manuscript, see the HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION to D&C 10 in the Joseph Smith Paper project.)

The Work of God

Martin Harris tells a young man the story of the lost manuscript, emphasizing that the works, designs and purposes of God cannot be frustrated (D&C 3,10).

As I looked at the paper plates that I had labeled, it reminded me of a BBQ. If I could only choose to have one set of plates at a BBQ, which would it be. At first you may think, “The Large of course”. But think of the purpose for each type of plate at a BBQ. Just as Nephi’s Plates served different purposes, the different size plates at a BBQ usually serve different foods. What is the Large plate for? The main course–you can put lots of different things on there. What are the Small plates for? That’s right–Dessert!!! It is smaller, and you have to be a bit more selective on what you put on it, but to me it is THE BEST part of any meal. So, given the fact that I have a major sweet-tooth, if I was given the option of choosing just one plate at a BBQ, I would usually pick the small plate. I love desserts! Yes, I like the meats and all that other good stuff. BUT I LOVE DESSERTS! When I am eating somewhere that dessert is served at the same time as the main course, I ALWAYS eat my dessert first (Ask my wife, she is witness, and besides that, it was the recommendation of my dentist!). Now dietary wise, it is a very poor choice that I am making, but it just tastes soooooo good. I LOVE IT!

LARGE PLATES = HISTORY SMALL PLATES MINISTRY

LARGE PLATES = HISTORY (Abridged)
SMALL PLATES = MINISTRY (Included)

Now the point to that whole rant is this: Nephi’s Large Plates had a lot of room for a lot of good stuff, and for the most part were historical in nature; good stuff, and lots of it, but not quite as “tasty” as what was on his Small Plates. The Small Plates, like the dessert plate at a BBQ, did not have as much room and therefore Nephi had to be more selective and stick to the best of the best in recording the ministry to the people. The Small Plates are the dessert of the gospel–the sweetest stuff he had to offer.

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (4)

So the next time you are at a BBQ you can remember that Nephi’s sweet ministry is on the Small Plates by having DESSERT FIRST!

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#BOMTC Mosiah 1-2: A Tent, a Temple, a Tower–See, Sacrifice, Serve

THE GREAT CONFERENCE OF 124 B.C. I like to compare this part of the Book of Mormon to our modern-day general conference of the church (Pretty good timing for this blog post, isn’t it?). Each time that I read this account I imagine what it would have been like to be there personally (I really do!). I love King Benjamin and his teachings! Not that everything else in the Book of Mormon isn’t as important, but I believe that if the Old Testament contained the account of King Benjamin (Mosiah 1-6) it would be one of the most beloved books of Christendom (and other faiths that revere the Old Testament.). In fact, President Howard W. Hunter called it, “…one of the greatest prophetic sermons ever given (“The Opening and Closing of Doors“, Ensign (CR), November 1987, p.54)

For my purpose today, I will simply focus on three simple words that help me remember the treasures of King Benjamin’s teachings: TENT, TEMPLE, TOWER. These are each nouns–simple objects–but they help me remember three simple verbs that make a BIG difference in life: SEE, SACRIFICE, SERVE. I will attempt to describe this relationship below…

#BOMTC Day 25, May 1~Mosiah 1-2 or Pages 145-150 (3)

A TENT: SEE!. Genesis 26:25, is the key to understanding the connection here. It seems like a very simple and informational verse, but in that scripture, relating to Isaac, you will find the words altar, tent, and well–there is great symbolism in those three words. Each word can symbolically represents an aspect of an individual’s life (anciently). Your “altar” represented your LORD. If your altar was made of unhewn stone, then people knew you worshiped Jehovah. If it were hewn, then people knew you worshiped a god of this world. Your “tent” represented your LIFE. You could tell all kinds of things about a person by simply looking at their tent. You can do the same when camping today. Your “well” represented your LIVELIHOOD. Isaac was a man of the flock and therefore was always in great need of a well (and notice where this scriptural event takes place–Beer-sheba, “well of an oath“. This may have been the same place which was called Beer-sheba a hundred years before this, in the time of Abraham; but as the well, from which it had its name originally, was closed up by the Philistines, the name of the place might have been abolished with the well; when, therefore, Isaac re-opened it, he restored the ancient name of the place. See Genesis 21 for the background to this significant well, and the verses in Genesis 26 that precede verse 25.).

Now, if our tent represents our life, then we can see a likening to the account found in Mosiah 1-2. Where did the people pitch their tents, and in which direction did they face them? “And they pitched their tents round about the temple, every man having his tent with the door thereof towards the temple” (Mosiah 2:6). If your tent represents your life, the what does the temple represent? As per the previous explanation  the temple is where the Lord’s altar was located, so the temple represent the LORD. So we would say that if your TENT is facing the TEMPLE, then your LIFE is facing the LORD!

A similar illustration can be found in several scriptural accounts. In Numbers 2 as the wondering Israelites are given their order of encampment, all tents are faced toward the Tabernacle! Another example is The Feast of Tabernacles (Lev. 23:34). The characteristic rite of the Feast of Tabernacles was the dwelling in booths made of the boughs of trees. Remarkable celebrations of the Feast of Tabernacles took place at the opening of Solomon’s temple (1 Kgs. 8:22 Chr. 5:37:8) and in the days of Ezra and Nehemiah (Neh. 8:14). Genesis 13:12; 14:12 is a great example of how facing one’s tent makes a difference. Lot goes from merely facing his tent toward Sodom to dwelling in Sodom (and we know what trouble that caused him…). He should have been more careful about which way he was facing his tent!

For those who are familiar with Salt Lake City, you know that the grid-system is the basis for addresses of businesses and homes. What you may not have realized is that each address is based on your position relative to the Salt Lake Temple. When you give someone your location/address in Salt Lake County, you are really just telling people how far you are/live from the temple (this system was developed when the Prophet Joseph Smith revealed the Plat of Zion [click here for a diagram]). If I were to move to 13200 S. 2700 W., I would be 132 streets South and 27 streets West of the Salt Lake City Temple. Pretty easy to find the temple!

A temple-centered life is a Christ-centered life! So… which way is your tent/LIFE facing?

During the press conference introducing Howard W. Hunter as the new President of the church, he presented the theme that would become the hallmark of his brief administration. He invited “the members of the Church to establish the temple of the Lord as the great symbol of their membership and the supernal setting for their most sacred covenants. It would be the deepest desire of my heart to have every member of the Church temple worthy. I would hope that every adult member would be worthy of—and carry—a current temple recommend, even if proximity to a temple does not allow immediate or frequent use of it. Let us be a temple-attending and a temple-loving people.” (Church History in the Fulness of Times, p. 625).

President Howard W. Hunter also said:

I invite the Latter-day Saints to look to the temple of the Lord as the great symbol of your membership. It is the deepest desire of my heart to have every member of the Church worthy to enter the temple. It would please the Lord if every adult member would [1] be worthy of-and carry-a current temple recommend. The things that we must do and not do to be worthy of a temple recommend are the very things that ensure we will be happy as individuals and as families. Let us be a temple-attending people. [2] Attend the temple as frequently as personal circumstances allow. [3] Keep a picture of a temple in your home that your children may see it. [4] Teach them about the purposes of the house of the Lord. Have them plan from their earliest years to go there and to remain worthy of that blessing. If proximity to a temple does not allow frequent attendance, [5] gather in the history of your family and prepare the names for the sacred ordinances performed only in the temple. This family research is essential to the work of the temples, and blessings surely will come to those who do that work.” (“Exceeding Great and Precious Promises“, Ensign, Nov. 1994)

The following account contains some great examples of how to face our tent/LIFE to the temple/LORD:

“Several years ago I heard about a good brother who described his attitude as President David O. McKay gave the concluding talk of general conference. It was a [muggy] afternoon, and this was the fifth session he had attended. He was sitting in the balcony, and his mind had a serious wandering problem. He noticed a man sitting in the middle section who had fallen asleep with his head tilted back and his mouth open. It occurred to him that if he were in the roof of the Tabernacle, he could drop a spit wad through one of the vent holes right into the mouth of that sleeping man. What a glorious thought! Following the meeting, he overheard two men talking about their feelings during President McKay’s talk. They were visibly moved by what they had heard. He thought to himself, ‘These two brethren were having a marvelous spiritual experience, and what was I doing? Thinking about dropping spit wads from the ceiling!’ President Spencer W. Kimball said that worship is “an individual responsibility, and regardless of what is said from the pulpit, if one wishes to worship the Lord in spirit and in truth, he may do so. If the service is a failure to you, you have failed. No one can worship for you; you must do your own waiting upon the Lord.” (Ensign, Jan. 1978, p. 5) One youth described how he first experienced the spirit of worship. He had been marginally active through his Aaronic Priesthood years. When he attended sacrament meeting, he usually sat in the back with a group of his friends, and he was less than a model of reverence. One day, however, he came in a little late, and there were no seats by his friends. He sat alone, and for the first time in his life, he closed his eyes during the prayers, he sang the hymns, he listened to the sacrament prayers, and he paid attention to the speakers. About midway through the first speaker, he found tears welling up in his eyes. With some embarrassment, he carefully glanced around; no one else seemed emotional. He didn’t know for sure what was happening to him, but the experience changed his life. It was during that meeting that he really started his spiritual preparation for his mission. He felt something, and fortunately, he acted and thus sustained those feelings. (Elder Jack H. Goaslind, Yagottawanna, Ensign, May 1991)

#BOMTC Day 25, May 1~Mosiah 1-2 or Pages 145-150 (5)
A TEMPLE: SACRIFICE.
 The tabernacle was a portable temple. Perhaps the best known temple in the Bible is the one built by Solomon in Jerusalem (2 Chronicles. 2–5). In the Book of Mormon, the righteous followers of God were led to build and worship in temples (2 Nephi 5:16Mosiah 1:183 Nephi 11:1). Ancient temples were places of animal sacrifice in similitude of the atoning sacrifice of the Only Begotten Son of God, Jesus Christ. Many people miss the fact that in Mosiah 2:3 the people “took of the firstlings of their flocks, that they might offer sacrifice and burn offerings according to the law of Moses.”

After Adam and Eve were cast out of the Garden of Eden, the Lord gave them the law of sacrifice. This law included offering the firstborn of their flocks. This sacrifice symbolized the sacrifice that would be made by the Only Begotten Son of God (Moses 5:4–8). This practice continued until the death of Jesus Christ, which ended animal sacrifice (Alma 34:13–14).

Originally, sacrifice meant to make something or someone holy (What an awesome way to think about sacrifice!). It has now come to mean to give up or suffer the loss of worldly things for the Lord and His Kingdom (I prefer the original meaning…). Disciples of Christ should be willing to sacrifice (MAKE HOLY) all things for the Lord. Joseph Smith taught that “a religion that does not require the sacrifice of all things never has the power sufficient to produce the faith necessary unto life and salvation” (Lectures on Faith, 69).

In the Church today members partake of the sacrament of the bread and the water in remembrance of the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. Members of Christ’s Church today are also asked to offer the sacrifice of a broken heart and a contrite spirit (3 Ne. 9:19–22). This means that they are humble, repentant, and willing to obey God’s commandments.

Modern-day temples continue to be a place of sacrifice today! For example, one must make certain sacrifices to be worthy to enter the temple and sacrifice must be made to actually worship in the temple. I like how Elder Neal A. Maxwell, of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, put it:

So it is that real, personal sacrifice never was placing an animal on the altar. Instead, it is a willingness to put the animal in us upon the altar and letting it be consumed! Such is the “sacrifice unto the Lord … of a broken heart and a contrite spirit,” (D&C 59:8), a prerequisite to taking up the cross, while giving “away all [our] sins” in order to “know God” (Alma 22:18) for the denial of self precedes the full acceptance of Him” (Ensign, May, 1995).

#BOMTC Day 25, May 1~Mosiah 1-2 or Pages 145-150 (4)

A TOWER: SERVE. Perhaps the most oft quoted verse of Mosiah 2 is verse 17, “And behold, I tell you these things that ye may learn wisdom; that ye may learn that when ye are in the service of your fellow beings ye are only in the service of your God” (my daughter’s current favorite scripture!). King Benjamin became himself the great object-lesson of Mosiah 2. As their king, and in his advanced age, he had not burdened them but rather served them–a servant-leader, like the Savior! Atop his tower–not because he is above them, but so that they can hear him–he stands as a symbol of service!

Elder Bruce R. McConkie taught that “service is essential to salvation.” (Ensign, June 1975)

President Marion G. Romney, who was a member of the First Presidency, taught:

Service is not something we endure on this earth so we can earn the right to live in the celestial kingdom. Service is the very fiber of which an exalted life in the celestial kingdom is made.  Knowing that service is what gives our Father in Heaven fulfillment, and knowing that we want to be where He is and as He is, why must we be commanded to serve one another? Oh, for the glorious day when these things all come naturally because of the purity of our hearts. In that day there will be no need for a commandment because we will have experienced for ourselves that we are truly happy only when we are engaged in unselfish service” (Ensign, Nov. 1982).

Elder Henry B. Eyring, then a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, expounded upon the fact that as “unprofitable servants” (Mosiah 2:21) we must do all that we can to repay our indebtedness to the Lord:

Let me give you three rules of managing the debts of gratitude you have accumulated …. First, wherever you may labor in life, give more than you take. Second, whoever is around you in life, find someone to help. And, third, ask God to multiply the power of your efforts to give and to help. …He will help you to give and to serve others, even when it seems nearly impossible. Then, you can rest assured that you have done your best to manage your debts of gratitude. But, of course, your debts will only grow, since God always blesses bountifully His grateful servants.” (“Debt Management“, Brigham Young University – Idaho Commencement April 27, 2002)

So important is the need for us to make a personal commitment to the service of our fellowmen that President Spencer W. Kimball made it the theme of a message to Regional Representatives in April 1980. He said:

Recently we established the new consolidated schedule which is aimed at enriching family life even further, together with greater opportunity for individual and family gospel scholarship and for more Christian service. We are trying to provide more time and emphasis on Christian service, so that our example can be more powerful in the world and so that those who are so worthy of attention might get more attention than they sometimes have in the past.” (“We Feel an Urgency,” Ensign, August 1980)

And in a message to the youth of the Church, President Kimball said: “The Lord does notice us, and he watches over us. But it is usually through another person that he meets our needs. Therefore, it is vital that we serve each other.” (“President Kimball Speaks Out on Service to Others,” New Era, March 1981)

Elder Dallin H. Oaks, of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, said:

We know . . . that even the most extreme acts of service-such as giving all of our goods to feed the poor-profit us nothing unless our service is motivated by the pure love of Christ. If our service is to be most efficacious, it must be accomplished for the love of God and the love of his children. . . . This principle-that our service should be for the love of God and the love of fellowmen rather than for personal advantage or any other lesser motive-is admittedly a high standard. The Savior must have seen it so, since he joined his commandment for selfless and complete love directly with the ideal of perfection . . . “Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect.” (Matt.5:48). . . . Service with all of our heart and mind is a high challenge for all of us. Such service must be free of selfish ambition. It must be motivated only by the pure love of Christ. . . . I know that God expects us to work to purify our hearts and our thoughts so that we may serve one another for the highest and best reason, the pure love of Christ. (Ensign, Nov. 1984, see also “Serve God By Serving Others)

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, also of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, illustrated the saving and sanctifying principle of service with the following true story:

Amidst the terrible hostilities in Missouri that would put the Prophet in Liberty Jail and see thousands of Latter-day Saints driven from their homes, Sister Drusilla Hendricks and her invalid husband, James, who had been shot by enemies of the Church in the Battle of Crooked River, arrived with their children at a hastily shaped dugout in Quincy, Illinois, to live out the spring of that harrowing year. Within two weeks the Hendrickses were on the verge of starvation, having only one spoonful of sugar and a saucerful of cornmeal remaining in their possession. In the great tradition of LDS women, Drusilla made mush out of it for James and the children, thus stretching its contents as far as she could make it go. When that small offering was consumed by her famished family, she washed everything, cleaned their little dugout as thoroughly as she could, and quietly waited to die. Not long thereafter the sound of a wagon brought Drusilla to her feet. It was their neighbor Reuben Allred. He said he had a feeling they were out of food, so on his way into town he’d had a sack of grain ground into meal for them. Shortly thereafter Alexander Williams arrived with two bushels of meal on his shoulder. He told Drusilla that he’d been extremely busy but the Spirit had whispered to him that Brother Hendricks family is suffering, so I dropped everything and came [running]. May God, who has blessed all of us so mercifully and many of us so abundantly, bless us with one thing more. May he bless us to hear the often silent cries of the sorrowing and the afflicted, the downtrodden, the disadvantaged, the poor. Indeed may he bless us to hear the whispering of the Holy Spirit when any neighbor anywhere is suffering, and to drop everything and come running. I pray in the name of the captain of the poor, even the Lord Jesus Christ, amen.” (“A Handful of Meal and a Little Oil”, Ensign, May 1996)

President Thomas S. Monson shared the following story of a pioneer family being blessed by celestial service:

One of my children came in, said that Brother Newton Halls folks were out of bread. Had none that day. I put our flour in sack to send up to Brother Halls. Just then Brother Hall came in. Says I, Brother Hall, how are you [fixed] for flour. Brother Millett, we have none. Well, Brother Hall, there is some in that sack. I have divided [it] and was going to send it to you. Your children told mine that you were out. Brother Hall began to cry. Said he had tried others. Could not get any. Went to the cedars and prayed to the Lord and the Lord told him to go to Joseph Millett. Well, Brother Hall, you neednt bring this back if the Lord sent you for it. You don’t owe me for it. You can’t tell how good it made me feel to know that the Lord knew that there was such a person as Joseph Millett.” (Gifts, Ensign, May 1993)

The Joseph Millett Story

Joseph Millett gives flour to a man who had been directed to him by the Lord.

In 1871, in the tiny Mormon farming settlement in Spring Valley, White Pine, Nevada (about 60 miles from Ely), Latter-day Saint Newman Hall found himself entirely out of flour and unable to feed his family. He asked some of his neighbors for help, but no one had a surplus. Finally he approached neighbor Joseph Millett who divided his supplies with the Halls. When Hall told him that he had been directed there following prayer, Millett told him there was no need to repay the loan. Millett recorded in his diary, “You can’t tell how good it made me feel to know that the Lord knew that there was such a person as Joseph Millett.

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#BOMTC Day 25, May 1~Mosiah 1-2 or Pages 145-150: A Tent, a Temple, a Tower: See, Sacrifice, Serve

#BOMTC Day 25, May 1~Mosiah 1-2 or Pages 145-150 (2)

Click on the graphic to read Mosiah 1-2

THE GREAT CONFERENCE OF 124 B.C. 

I like to compare this part of the Book of Mormon to our modern-day general conference of the church. Each time that I read this account I imagine what it would have been like to be there personally (I really do!).

I love King Benjamin and his teachings! Not that everything else in the Book of Mormon is not as important, but I believe that if the Old Testament contained the account of King Benjamin (Mosiah 1-6) it would be one of the most beloved books of Christendom (and other faiths that revere the Old Testament). In fact, President Howard W. Hunter called it, “…one of the greatest prophetic sermons ever given (“The Opening and Closing of Doors“, Ensign, Nov. 1987.)

For my purpose today I will simply focus on three simple words that help me remember some treasures of King Benjamin’s teachings: TENT, TEMPLE, TOWER. These are each nouns–simple objects–but they help me remember three simple verbs that make a BIG difference in life: SEE, SACRIFICE, SERVE. I will attempt to describe this relationship below…

#BOMTC Day 25, May 1~Mosiah 1-2 or Pages 145-150 (3)

A TENT: SEE!. Genesis 26:25, is the key to understanding the connection here. It seems like a very simple and contextual verse, but in that scripture, relating to Isaac, you will find the words altar, tent, and well–there is great symbolism in those three words. Each word can symbolically represents an aspect of an individual’s life (anciently).

Your “altar” represented your LORD. If your altar was made of unhewn stone, then people knew you worshiped Jehovah. If it were hewn, then people knew you worshiped a god of this world.

Your “tent” represented your LIFE. You could tell all kinds of things about a person by simply looking at their tent. You can do the same when camping today.

Your “well” represented your LIVELIHOOD. Isaac was a man of the flock and therefore was always in great need of a well (and notice where this scriptural event takes place–Beer-sheba, “well of an oath“. This may have been the same place which was called Beer-sheba a hundred years before this, in the time of Abraham; but as the well, from which it had its name originally, was closed up by the Philistines, the name of the place might have been abolished with the well; when, therefore, Isaac re-opened it, he restored the ancient name of the place. See Genesis 21 for the background to this significant well, and the verses in Genesis 26 that precede verse 25.).

Now, if our tent represents our life, then we can see a likening to the account found in Mosiah 1-2. Where did the people pitch their tents, and in which direction did they face them? “And they pitched their tents round about the temple, every man having his tent with the door thereof towards the temple” (Mosiah 2:6). If your tent represents your life, the what does the temple represent? As per the previous explanation, the temple is where the Lord’s altar was located, so the temple represent the LORD. Thus, we would say that if your TENT is facing the TEMPLE, then your LIFE is facing the LORD!

A similar illustration can be found in several scriptural accounts. In Numbers 2 as the wondering Israelites are given their order of encampment, all tents are faced toward the Tabernacle! Another example is The Feast of Tabernacles (Lev. 23:34). The characteristic rite of the Feast of Tabernacles was the dwelling in booths made of the boughs of trees. Remarkable celebrations of the Feast of Tabernacles took place at the opening of Solomon’s temple (1 Kgs. 8:22 Chr. 5:37:8) and in the days of Ezra and Nehemiah (Neh. 8:14). Genesis 13:12; 14:12 is a great example of how facing one’s tent makes a difference. Lot goes from merely facing his tent toward Sodom to dwelling in Sodom (and we know what trouble that caused him…). He should have been more careful about which way he was facing his tent!

For those who are familiar with Salt Lake City, you know that the grid-system is the basis for addresses of businesses and homes. What you may not have realized is that each address is based on your position relative to the Salt Lake Temple. When you give someone your location/address in Salt Lake County, you are really telling people how far you are/live from the temple (this system was developed when the Prophet Joseph Smith revealed the Plat of Zion [click here for a diagram]). If I were to move to 13200 S. 2700 W., I would be 132 streets South and 27 streets West of the Salt Lake City Temple. Pretty easy to find the temple!

A temple-centered life is a Christ-centered life! So… which way is your tent/LIFE facing?

During the press conference introducing Howard W. Hunter as the new President of the church, he presented the theme that would become the hallmark of his brief administration. He invited “the members of the Church to establish the temple of the Lord as the great symbol of their membership and the supernal setting for their most sacred covenants. It would be the deepest desire of my heart to have every member of the Church temple worthy. I would hope that every adult member would be worthy of—and carry—a current temple recommend, even if proximity to a temple does not allow immediate or frequent use of it. Let us be a temple-attending and a temple-loving people.” (Church History in the Fulness of Times, p. 625).

President Howard W. Hunter also said:

I invite the Latter-day Saints to look to the temple of the Lord as the great symbol of your membership. It is the deepest desire of my heart to have every member of the Church worthy to enter the temple. It would please the Lord if every adult member would [1] be worthy of-and carry-a current temple recommend. The things that we must do and not do to be worthy of a temple recommend are the very things that ensure we will be happy as individuals and as families. Let us be a temple-attending people. [2] Attend the temple as frequently as personal circumstances allow. [3] Keep a picture of a temple in your home that your children may see it. [4] Teach them about the purposes of the house of the Lord. Have them plan from their earliest years to go there and to remain worthy of that blessing. If proximity to a temple does not allow frequent attendance, [5] gather in the history of your family and prepare the names for the sacred ordinances performed only in the temple. This family research is essential to the work of the temples, and blessings surely will come to those who do that work.” (“Exceeding Great and Precious Promises“, Ensign, Nov. 1994)

The following account contains some great examples of how to face our tent/LIFE to the temple/LORD:

“Several years ago I heard about a good brother who described his attitude as President David O. McKay gave the concluding talk of general conference. It was a [muggy] afternoon, and this was the fifth session he had attended. He was sitting in the balcony, and his mind had a serious wandering problem. He noticed a man sitting in the middle section who had fallen asleep with his head tilted back and his mouth open. It occurred to him that if he were in the roof of the Tabernacle, he could drop a spit wad through one of the vent holes right into the mouth of that sleeping man. What a glorious thought! Following the meeting, he overheard two men talking about their feelings during President McKay’s talk. They were visibly moved by what they had heard. He thought to himself, ‘These two brethren were having a marvelous spiritual experience, and what was I doing? Thinking about dropping spit wads from the ceiling!’ President Spencer W. Kimball said that worship is “an individual responsibility, and regardless of what is said from the pulpit, if one wishes to worship the Lord in spirit and in truth, he may do so. If the service is a failure to you, you have failed. No one can worship for you; you must do your own waiting upon the Lord.” (Ensign, Jan. 1978, p. 5) One youth described how he first experienced the spirit of worship. He had been marginally active through his Aaronic Priesthood years. When he attended sacrament meeting, he usually sat in the back with a group of his friends, and he was less than a model of reverence. One day, however, he came in a little late, and there were no seats by his friends. He sat alone, and for the first time in his life, he closed his eyes during the prayers, he sang the hymns, he listened to the sacrament prayers, and he paid attention to the speakers. About midway through the first speaker, he found tears welling up in his eyes. With some embarrassment, he carefully glanced around; no one else seemed emotional. He didn’t know for sure what was happening to him, but the experience changed his life. It was during that meeting that he really started his spiritual preparation for his mission. He felt something, and fortunately, he acted and thus sustained those feelings. (Elder Jack H. Goaslind, Yagottawanna, Ensign, May 1991)

#BOMTC Day 25, May 1~Mosiah 1-2 or Pages 145-150 (5)
A TEMPLE: SACRIFICE.
 The tabernacle was a portable temple. Perhaps the best known temple in the Bible is the one built by Solomon in Jerusalem (2 Chronicles. 2–5). In the Book of Mormon, the righteous followers of God were led to build and worship in temples (2 Nephi 5:16Mosiah 1:183 Nephi 11:1). Ancient temples were places of animal sacrifice in similitude of the atoning sacrifice of the Only Begotten Son of God, Jesus Christ. Many people miss the fact that in Mosiah 2:3 the people “took of the firstlings of their flocks, that they might offer sacrifice and burn offerings according to the law of Moses.”

After Adam and Eve were cast out of the Garden of Eden, the Lord gave them the law of sacrifice. This law included offering the firstborn of their flocks. This sacrifice symbolized the sacrifice that would be made by the Only Begotten Son of God (Moses 5:4–8). This practice continued until the death of Jesus Christ, which ended animal sacrifice (Alma 34:13–14).

Originally, sacrifice meant “to make something or someone holy” (What an awesome way to think about sacrifice!). It has now come to mean to give up or suffer the loss of worldly things for the Lord and His Kingdom (I prefer the original meaning…). Disciples of Christ should be willing to sacrifice (MAKE HOLY) all things for the Lord. Joseph Smith taught that “a religion that does not require the sacrifice of all things never has the power sufficient to produce the faith necessary unto life and salvation” (Lectures on Faith, 69).

In the Church today members partake of the sacrament of the bread and the water in remembrance of the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. Members of Christ’s Church today are also asked to offer the sacrifice of a broken heart and a contrite spirit (3 Ne. 9:19–22). This means that they are humble, repentant, and willing to obey God’s commandments.

Modern-day temples continue to be a place of sacrifice today! For example, one must make certain sacrifices to be worthy to enter the temple and sacrifice must be made to actually worship in the temple. I like how Elder Neal A. Maxwell, of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, put it:

So it is that real, personal sacrifice never was placing an animal on the altar. Instead, it is a willingness to put the animal in us upon the altar and letting it be consumed! Such is the “sacrifice unto the Lord … of a broken heart and a contrite spirit,” (D&C 59:8), a prerequisite to taking up the cross, while giving “away all [our] sins” in order to “know God” (Alma 22:18) for the denial of self precedes the full acceptance of Him” (Ensign, May, 1995).

#BOMTC Day 25, May 1~Mosiah 1-2 or Pages 145-150 (4)

A TOWER: SERVE. Perhaps the most oft quoted verse of Mosiah 2 is verse 17, “And behold, I tell you these things that ye may learn wisdom; that ye may learn that when ye are in the service of your fellow beings ye are only in the service of your God” (my daughter’s current favorite scripture!). King Benjamin became himself the great object-lesson of Mosiah 2. As their king, and in his advanced age, he had not burdened them but rather served them–a servant-leader, like the Savior! Atop his tower–not because he is above them, but so that they can hear him–he stands as a symbol of service!

Elder Bruce R. McConkie taught that “service is essential to salvation.” (Ensign, June 1975)

President Marion G. Romney, who was a member of the First Presidency, taught:

Service is not something we endure on this earth so we can earn the right to live in the celestial kingdom. Service is the very fiber of which an exalted life in the celestial kingdom is made.  Knowing that service is what gives our Father in Heaven fulfillment, and knowing that we want to be where He is and as He is, why must we be commanded to serve one another? Oh, for the glorious day when these things all come naturally because of the purity of our hearts. In that day there will be no need for a commandment because we will have experienced for ourselves that we are truly happy only when we are engaged in unselfish service” (Ensign, Nov. 1982).

Elder Henry B. Eyring, then a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, expounded upon the fact that as “unprofitable servants” (Mosiah 2:21) we must do all that we can to repay our indebtedness to the Lord:

Let me give you three rules of managing the debts of gratitude you have accumulated …. First, wherever you may labor in life, give more than you take. Second, whoever is around you in life, find someone to help. And, third, ask God to multiply the power of your efforts to give and to help. …He will help you to give and to serve others, even when it seems nearly impossible. Then, you can rest assured that you have done your best to manage your debts of gratitude. But, of course, your debts will only grow, since God always blesses bountifully His grateful servants.” (“Debt Management“, Brigham Young University – Idaho Commencement April 27, 2002)

So important is the need for us to make a personal commitment to the service of our fellowmen that President Spencer W. Kimball made it the theme of a message to Regional Representatives in April 1980. He said:

Recently we established the new consolidated schedule which is aimed at enriching family life even further, together with greater opportunity for individual and family gospel scholarship and for more Christian service. We are trying to provide more time and emphasis on Christian service, so that our example can be more powerful in the world and so that those who are so worthy of attention might get more attention than they sometimes have in the past.” (“We Feel an Urgency,” Ensign, August 1980)

And in a message to the youth of the Church, President Kimball said: “The Lord does notice us, and he watches over us. But it is usually through another person that he meets our needs. Therefore, it is vital that we serve each other.” (“President Kimball Speaks Out on Service to Others,” New Era, March 1981)

Elder Dallin H. Oaks, of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, said:

We know . . . that even the most extreme acts of service-such as giving all of our goods to feed the poor-profit us nothing unless our service is motivated by the pure love of Christ. If our service is to be most efficacious, it must be accomplished for the love of God and the love of his children. . . . This principle-that our service should be for the love of God and the love of fellowmen rather than for personal advantage or any other lesser motive-is admittedly a high standard. The Savior must have seen it so, since he joined his commandment for selfless and complete love directly with the ideal of perfection . . . “Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect.” (Matt.5:48). . . . Service with all of our heart and mind is a high challenge for all of us. Such service must be free of selfish ambition. It must be motivated only by the pure love of Christ. . . . I know that God expects us to work to purify our hearts and our thoughts so that we may serve one another for the highest and best reason, the pure love of Christ. (Ensign, Nov. 1984, see also “Serve God By Serving Others)

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland, also of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, illustrated the saving and sanctifying principle of service with the following true story:

Amidst the terrible hostilities in Missouri that would put the Prophet in Liberty Jail and see thousands of Latter-day Saints driven from their homes, Sister Drusilla Hendricks and her invalid husband, James, who had been shot by enemies of the Church in the Battle of Crooked River, arrived with their children at a hastily shaped dugout in Quincy, Illinois, to live out the spring of that harrowing year. Within two weeks the Hendrickses were on the verge of starvation, having only one spoonful of sugar and a saucerful of cornmeal remaining in their possession. In the great tradition of LDS women, Drusilla made mush out of it for James and the children, thus stretching its contents as far as she could make it go. When that small offering was consumed by her famished family, she washed everything, cleaned their little dugout as thoroughly as she could, and quietly waited to die. Not long thereafter the sound of a wagon brought Drusilla to her feet. It was their neighbor Reuben Allred. He said he had a feeling they were out of food, so on his way into town he’d had a sack of grain ground into meal for them. Shortly thereafter Alexander Williams arrived with two bushels of meal on his shoulder. He told Drusilla that he’d been extremely busy but the Spirit had whispered to him that Brother Hendricks family is suffering, so I dropped everything and came [running]. May God, who has blessed all of us so mercifully and many of us so abundantly, bless us with one thing more. May he bless us to hear the often silent cries of the sorrowing and the afflicted, the downtrodden, the disadvantaged, the poor. Indeed may he bless us to hear the whispering of the Holy Spirit when any neighbor anywhere is suffering, and to drop everything and come running. I pray in the name of the captain of the poor, even the Lord Jesus Christ, amen.” (“A Handful of Meal and a Little Oil”, Ensign, May 1996)

President Thomas S. Monson shared the following story of a pioneer family being blessed by celestial service:

One of my children came in, said that Brother Newton Halls folks were out of bread. Had none that day. I put our flour in sack to send up to Brother Halls. Just then Brother Hall came in. Says I, Brother Hall, how are you [fixed] for flour. Brother Millett, we have none. Well, Brother Hall, there is some in that sack. I have divided [it] and was going to send it to you. Your children told mine that you were out. Brother Hall began to cry. Said he had tried others. Could not get any. Went to the cedars and prayed to the Lord and the Lord told him to go to Joseph Millett. Well, Brother Hall, you neednt bring this back if the Lord sent you for it. You don’t owe me for it. You can’t tell how good it made me feel to know that the Lord knew that there was such a person as Joseph Millett.” (Gifts, Ensign, May 1993)

The Joseph Millett Story

Joseph Millett gives flour to a man who had been directed to him by the Lord.

In 1871, in the tiny Mormon farming settlement in Spring Valley, White Pine, Nevada (about 60 miles from Ely), Latter-day Saint Newman Hall found himself entirely out of flour and unable to feed his family. He asked some of his neighbors for help, but no one had a surplus. Finally he approached neighbor Joseph Millett who divided his supplies with the Halls. When Hall told him that he had been directed there following prayer, Millett told him there was no need to repay the loan. Millett recorded in his diary, “You can’t tell how good it made me feel to know that the Lord knew that there was such a person as Joseph Millett.

Want to learn more? Check these out:

ON THIS DAY IN 1829: Palmyra, New York. Martin Harris’s wife, Lucy, filed a complaint against Joseph Smith, attempting to prove that he never had gold plates.

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#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144: Plates, Prophets, and Prosperity

Click on the graphic to read Jarom-Words of Mormon

Something that stands out to me in these pages is how to prosper in the Promised Land.

Plates and Lineage via Book of Mormon Central, featuring Mormon Abridging the Plates by Tom Lovell and The Gold Plates by Jerry Thompson

The Lord provided prophets and plates to preserve and prosper His people in the Promised Land (that is my attempt at Maxwellian alliteration…). Within these few pages we find the rise and demise of different civilizations, and generations within those civilizations, based on their diligence in heeding the words of the prophets of God. Those who preserve and obey God’s word prosper; those who do not falter. Those who obey the Lord prevail; those who rebel fail. So, do you want to prosper or falter; do you want to prevail or fail? The Lord has given us everything we need to succeed!

Sources for the Book of Mormon

The sources behind the Book of Mormon are remarkably complex, and sometimes hard to keep straight. Here is a helpful chart to use as you read and study. (Content by John Welch. Graphics by Fernando Vazquez.)

These few pages cover many different individuals, groups of people, eras, and years. Below you will find several charts that may help you study this material more effectively.

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (3)

A simple way to mark the the table of contents in the Book of Mormon to help you understand the organization of the “plates”.

 

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (4)

Visual explanation of “A Brief Explanation about the Book of Mormon” found at the beginning of the Book of Mormon

 

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (5)

Genealogical, historical, legal, and prophetic records of the Nephites were handed down in sacred trust, usually from father to son. Only four Nephite families kept the plates: Lehi’s posterity mainly through Jacob, Mosiah’s family, Alma and his long line of descendants, and Mormon and his son Moroni. As anthropologist John L. Sorenson has pointed out, the Book of Mormon is structured as a “lineage history.” Inserted from http://byustudies.byu.edu/januarybomcharts/charts/16.html | view PDF

Below you will find the four families of Nephite record keepers of the Book of Mormon listed chronologically, along with their approximate dates of birth and other relevant information. If a date is not found in or tied directly to a specific verse, then the information has been deduced from general historical information. This list is similar to the chart above and can be used to document and explain the relationships between keepers of the plates of Nephi. Inserted from http://byustudies.byu.edu/januarybomcharts/charts/17.html | View PDF

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (6) #BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (7) #BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (8)

#BOMTC Day 24, April 30~Jarom-Words of Mormon or Pages 139-144 (9)

Although four families kept the main Nephite records (see the charts above), the words of many other authors are included in the Book of Mormon as well. The writings or speeches of Jesus Christ, Isaiah, Captain Moroni, and Zenos, for example, all add significantly to the Book of Mormon, even though these authors did not actually write upon the plates themselves. This chart adds to charts above some of the additional writers or speakers who are quoted in the Book of Mormon. Inserted from http://byustudies.byu.edu/januarybomcharts/charts/18.html | View PDF

Keep Calm and Study the Book of Mormon

#BOMTC: “Keep Calm and Study the Book of Mormon”

For a Wise Purpose

A seminary teacher uses over-sized models of the Book of Mormon, the gold plates, and other source plates to help his students understand the structure of the book . (11:18)

BONUS! My buddy, Adam Daly, sent me a chart that he created in an effort to help him understand his scripture study better. It expands on what I have listed here, and I find it very informative. It is not exhaustive, but it is very helpful! I would invite you to put your own effort into a similar endeavor so that you can receive the benefit of such diligent study and pondering. Please click on the chart to enlarge it.

Chart created by Adam Daly. He said,

CLICK ON THE CHART TO ENLARGE IT. Chart created by Adam Daly. He said, “Seeing it laid out like this helped me understand the Book or Mormon better and also remember people, places and stories better.”

Want to know more? Check this out:

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#BOMTC Day 20, April 26~2 Nephi 32-Jacob 1 or Pages 115-120: From Nephi to Jacob

#BOMTC Day 20, April 26~2 Nephi 32-Jacob 1 or Pages 115-120 (2)

Click graphi to read 2 Nephi 32-Jacob 1
Painting credit: Al Young

These pages mark a major transition in the Book of Mormon.

Nephi’s final words are found in 2 Nephi 32-33, and once again we find his great anxiety for our welfare and his pattern for plainness (2 Nephi 32:8; 33:3-9). His final words are an invitation to “hearken unto these words and believe in Christ” (2 Nephi 33:10-15). A more simple, yet perfectly suited ending could not have been better for Nephi’s writings:

“for thus hath the Lord commanded me, and I must obey” (2 Nephi 33:15).

No wonder Nephi’s name seems to spring from our lips so effortlessly when illustrating examples of obedience!

#BOMTC Day 20, April 26~2 Nephi 32-Jacob 1 or Pages 115-120 FEAST Upon the Words of Christ

Jacob inherits Nephi’s Small Plates and is given instruction on what should be recorded on them (Jacob 1:1-4). Jacob is not at all new to the Book of Mormon. In fact, much of 2 Nephi is actually Nephi recording Jacob’s teaching and preaching. Many of our favorite teachings from 2 Nephi came from Jacob (2 Nephi 9 is just one example). As Nephi dies, Jacob takes ecclesiastical responsibility for the Nephite society. Unfortunately, the Nephites are struggling with quite a few spiritual problems (Jacob 1:15-16).

Reminiscent of many prophets before, and others yet to come, Jacob uses the Temple as his stage for calling the people to repentance. Nephi’s “plainness” seems to have had an effect on Jacob’s preaching (Jacob 2:11). Jacob must now help the people overcome their love of riches (v. 12), their pride (vv. 13-21), and their immorality (vv. 23-35). It’s a tough job, but Jacob has been called of God and is capable of the task at hand (Jacob 1:17-19; 2:1-7)!

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